Category Archives: Stacking

Bad Bridge Behavior (2014)

This discussion applies to Windows machines in particular. We welcome your comments on whether the same problem occurs on Macs.

In Summary

Installing Photoshop CC 2014 on a Windows machine may have unpleasant side effects and one of those side effects is being forced to use ONLY Photoshop CC 2014 from Adobe Bridge.

The Details

Adobe Bridge is a rather powerful tool. In fact, we recommend it when using the Advanced Stacker PLUS. However during a live webinar recently Bridge stymied us.

Despite the release of many CC 2014 versions, there is currently no Adobe Bridge CC 2014 – the latest available is CC. Within Adobe Bridge CC a double click of a JPG or RAW file opens the file clicked in the most recently installed version of Photoshop EXCEPT if there is already a version of Photoshop running. If, for example you have Photoshop CS5 running and the most recent install is CC, then a double click would open the file in CS5 rather than CC. Adobe Bridge default file open still behaves the same way even after upgrading to Photoshop CC 2014. However other parts of Adobe Bridge do not behave the same.

The Tools -> Photoshop -> Batch operation previously worked just as described. No matter what the default version of Photoshop, using the Tools -> option would kick the currently running Photoshop and elicit Photoshop’s Batch menu. UNFORTUNATELY, The “Tools -> Photoshop -> Batch” operation does NOT work the same way once you install Photoshop 2014 CC.  With Photoshop CC 2014 installed, Tools -> Photoshop -> Batch will ONLY open Photoshop CC 2014. If you have another version of Photoshop already running, the Tools operation effort silently fails.

You can determine what version of Photoshop will be invoked by the Bridge -> Tools menu by selecting a file and doing  a “right click” and inspecting what is listed in the Open With list.

Default association

Default association

 

Also particularly unpleasant is the fact that only ONE of the Photoshop CS versions is listed as a choice in the Open With dialog even though on our windows machine we have 4 versions of Photoshop installed (CS5, CS6, CC and CC 2014). We’d love it if we could choose which Photoshop to open, but Photoshop CC 2014 confuses Windows into thinking that ALL versions of Photoshop are CS 2014. Normally in the the windows file browser you can right-click a file and “choose a default” program to open it.

Windows_ChooseDefaultPgm

Here we’ve chosen to associate a default to a PNG file.

Window_FileAssociation_Step1 The next step is to navigate to the program we want to open with by default… Here we will select the Photoshop CS5 folder, and next the photoshop.exe
Windows_SelectAssociation

After selecting photoshop.exe in the CS5 directory, we are disappointed to see the result look like this:WindowsPSCC2014_Confused

To Change Associations For Different File Types

While Photoshop does continue to make useful improvements, not all of those improvements are as easy to navigate. If you would prefer that Adobe Bridge open a different default version of Photoshop you can change the file associations within Adobe Bridge as shown. (Select Edit -> Preferences or Ctl-K).

Changing File Association

Changing File Association – click for a larger view

Look What You Did!

First we really appreciate the mastery of Matt Molloy who has been using the Advanced Stacker PLUS to reach creative new heights in “TimeStacks”.  This is one of his images below in which he stacks part of the image with Comet mode, and the rest with lighten mode. Click the image to read more.

Reach for the Clouds by Matt Molloy

Reach for the Clouds by Matt Molloy

We invited users of the Advanced Stacker PLUS to give us feedback on their experiences with our Photoshop Add-in. We asked folks is if they had an image that they made with the software that they’d like us to see. Wow. We are impressed! Take a look for yourself. We used the links provided so none of the images shown are on our server. In other words, if an image does not load properly, there is nothing we at StarCircleAcademy can do to fix the issue.  Where possible, clicking the image will take you to the photographer’s site.

Version 14E is available now, by the way.

If your image appears here and you’d rather it did not, let us know and we’ll remove it.

Exit Criteria

Exit Criteria by Steven Christenson (channeling Matt Molloy)

'Aurora Star Trails' - Trwyn Du, Anglesey

Aurora Star Trails by Adrian Kingsley Hughes

Rocky Mtns

Rocky Mountains by Bob Gibbon

The Chalice by John Mu

The Chalice by John Mumaw

Gulf of Mexico

Gulf of Mexico by John C. Struck

Church by Bob Edwards

Church by Bob Edwards

OG PIER 1 by Daniel P Studios

OG PIER 1 by Daniel P Studios

Lassen Campfire Pano 1

Lassen Campfire Pano 1

Red River Camping Spot Star Trails by Jeff Stephens

Red River Camping Spot Star Trails by Jeff Stephens

Milky Way Star Trails

Milky Way Star Trails by Beau Liddell

Stow Time Stall by Brian Drourr

Stow Time Stall by Brian Drourr

Starflight over Pointy Land

Starflight over Pointy Land by Steven Christenson

Chapel in Starlight by Keith Doucet

Chapel in Starlight by Keith Doucet

Philosophy of Advanced Stacker PLUS

ASP14e-500

Coming soon…

Our 14e release is imminent. But after looking at our survey results and the most recently reported issues, we thought it wise to provide some hints to help you use the current software and to help you understand tradeoffs we made.

Our most commonly reported issue is something we struggled with. In an attempt to help users understand features we caused confusion. What are we talking about?  There are pop up windows: some of which should be Continued some of which should be Stopped. The only notification tool that works across all versions of Photoshop reliably doesn’t allow much customization, so when confronted with each of these dialogs, its understandable why some people click Stop when they should Continue and click Continue when they should Stop. The pop-up window below was the worst. We added highlighting to make it easy to see the difference, but we can’t use color or graphics on the actual pop-up without creating compatibility problems.  Do you notice the difference?

ASP14d_NotStop

This dialog indicates that the Watermark Alignment is not set… click CONTINUE

ASP14d_DoStop

If you stop on the first dialog, the layers needed to do stacking are not created and you will get errors the first of which is usually “Move is not currently available”

Move Not Available

Move Not Available

Once there is any kind of error it’s time to Stop and restart because manipulating layers in Photoshop is a little fragile.  The good news is the first pop-up can be turned off. The better news is that in 14e we have already turned it off for you. In fact in 14e we’ve trimmed down interaction as much as possible but still kept the awesome extra features.  Here is how to turn off the first pop-up (the one regarding Watermark Alignment) in version 14d and earlier.

Stop the Pop

Stop the Pop – disable the “Stop” step in Align My Watermark

Power of the Batch

The Advanced Stacker PLUS derives much of it’s power from two key things: Photoshop’s ability to batch process images AND Photoshop’s ability to open just about any image format on the planet.  Batch processing works because it is possible to use File -> Automate -> Batch to hurl a handful or a folder full of images at customized scripts and actions.  While Adobe Photoshop Elements has a “batch processor” there is no way to do operations other than those that are built-in to the software and that’s why ASP doesn’t support Elements.

One of the weaknesses of using Photoshop’s captive power is that it requires exploiting the tool in ways that are “allowed”.  While we like Adobe Photoshop CC, there are still many people who are very happy with older, non-cloud versions of Photoshop like CS3 or CS4.  We chose to not abandon that 35% of our customers so we support ALL CS versions of Photoshop on both Mac and PC. and that means we limit our actions and scripts to features that are common across all those versions and platforms. Readers may not be aware, for example, that while Adobe has published tools for customizing the interface, those tools have generally only supported the “latest” version of software. Indeed one of the most used tools (Configurator) has been abandoned and is no longer supported.

Another tradeoff has been in how we document our features. For example the File -> Automate -> Batch method of stacking a folder full of files is workable, if inelegant. But we use the Photoshop Bridge method of feeding the stacker and like it much more for several significant reasons.  One huge advantage of using Bridge is that you can actually see the content of the files. Another obvious advantage is that you are not constrained by what’s in your folder. If you have 29 shots from one sequence and 120 of another sequence you don’t have to split those shots between folders. And, in fact, with Bridge to select files you don’t have to use the same stacking method for all the files of one set, or have files from only one folder!

A word about 14E

As noted above, version 14E is imminent. Surprisingly the biggest obstacle has not been the additional features, the primary obstacle has been packaging and delivering the content. Windows 8.1 and Mac OSX 10.9 have gotten very protective of their machines and throw up many roadblocks to try to keep your machine safe from viruses and trojans. This means we had to invest $1500 dollars to become an LLC, get signed up for the Mac developer plan, get a Mac code signing certificate and get a code signing certificate for Windows, too! That doesn’t include acquiring a Mac or polishing the scripts and installers on each machine. Here is what the problem looks like on a Windows PC using Internet Explorer without signed code (it’s just as bad with Safari on Mac).

ASP_IE_RunAnyway

In fact, on both machines even though the code is signed (proving its provenance), you are still likely to get a warning like “This is not a commonly downloaded file”. It might be easier if we could email it to you, right? Except that Google, Yahoo and many others will not deliver an email that includes any executable content.

Both PCs and Macs have reached this point described in a Mac advertisement from 2009 that pokes fun at Vista’s intrusive safety system. Guess what… both machines are becoming like this because there are so many, uh, jerks out there eager to harm you electronically.

Our holy grail has been to create a single deliverable package that works both on a PC and on your Mac that we can document clearly, simply and as completely as possible.  That was probably too high a goal.

What’s coming in 14e?

  • Installation now is as simple as clicking.
  • EXIF data for the first image is preserved
  • New stacking mode of Ultra Streaks
  • Streamlined pop-ups to the minimum
  • Fully supports paths on both PC and Mac
  • Installation works for ALL versions of Photoshop CS you have installed on your machine
  • A price increase. But current owners will get the upgrade for free.
  • Some features we’re keeping under wraps for now.

Trimming away the Excess (Photoshop)

I created a problem for myself twice and with the Total Lunar Eclipse coming in April, 2014 I suspect I’ll be creating the same problem again.  I wanted to record a time-lapse of the May 20, 2012 Annular Solar Eclipse as well as the June 5, 2012 Transit of Venus.  I used a solar filter and an Equatorial Mount to help me track the sun. Unfortunately getting a good polar alignment during daylight is beyond my skill set. Without good alignment I had to manually repoint the telescope rather frequently. It is not necessary to understand any of the gobbledygook you just read except to know that the sun was MOVING from frame to frame – see the image below.  With all that movement, a time-lapse looks like a jitterbug dance.  In fact, this artsy composite shows just how much the sun moved around in my frame – that is, all over!

Solar Art

Annular Solar Eclipse with un-centered and trimmed frames. AKA Solar Art the “dots” on the sun are large sunspots.

My friends suffered from similar problems and each of them undertook automated solutions to the problem using Photoshop or something similar.  My goal was to solve the problem in a generic way and along the way I learned some useful additional Photoshop tricks.

The Solution

I used the trim feature of Photoshop.  You can find Trim under Image -> Trim.

Trim makes note of the current value of the upper left (or lower right) pixel. It then creates a selection that includes all of the rows and columns that have the same value and inverts the selection. Finally it crops off all of the selected area into the smallest possible rectangle.

An easy way to think of this is: imagine a dark photo with a white frame around it.  By using “trim” the entire white frame will be cut away.  The same approach works if the frame border is black, blue, transparent, and so on.

But there is a catch!  There is no tolerance setting for the trim value so whatever needs to be trimmed must be an exact color match. Unfortunately this presents a problem because even in a photo of a black sky, the black areas are not uniformly black.  Some values may be 0,0,0 but others 1,2,1.  And then there is noise!  Even though you may not notice a difference between two adjacent pixels trim only operates on those pixels that have EXACTLY the same value as the upper left or lower right.

To get trim to work in a reasonable fashion, therefore, we must turn all of the almost black pixels into black (or some other color).  I feel a Photoshop trick coming on here. Our trick is to use a duplicate layer and adjust it to cause it to trim the way we want. We will discard the duplicated layer when we are done.

Trim-o-Matic

  1. Open the image.
  2. Duplicate the image as a new layer.
  3. If the duplicate layer is a smart object, convert it to a raster layer. (To convert a smart object to a Rasterized Layer, open the layer palette, right-click on the duplicate layer and select “Rasterize Layer”)
  4. On the duplicate layer use
    “Filter -> Noise -> Dust and Scratches” with Radius = 3 and Threshold = 3.
  5. Make sure your foreground color is black (x is the hot key).
  6. Use the “Fill” tool (paint bucket) with tolerance set to 40, Opacity 100%, Mode = Normal and no options checked.  Click the extreme upper left pixel. Fill will replace all of the outer area with black. You may want to click multiple times.
  7. If you have some areas that are brighter than the object, you may also want to apply a brightness and contrast adjustment.
  8. Use the trim function on the current layer with all boxes checked and “Top Left Pixel Color” selected.
  9. Trimming changes both the working layer and the original layer below it.
  10. Discard the working layer.

Here are the steps in illustrations.

Rasterizing a smart object

Rasterizing a smart object

PS_DustAndScratches

Dust and Scratches settings

gs_2014-03-23_084744

Filling with black

Filling with black (might need to repeat this)

Dust and Scratches + Fill may not be enough. Fortunately the duplicate layer can be severely adjusted if needed since it will be discarded.

 

Trimming Tool

Trimming Tool

Select Areas for Trimming

Select Areas for Trimming

 

After Trimming

After Trimming

Delete the Extra Layer

Delete the layer that was created for the sole purpose of trimming

 

What If It Crops Too Tightly or Inconsistently?

This set of steps written as an action can be used to automate the process of trimming. There are still a few remaining problems to work out. Sometimes after trimming the total horizontal or vertical pixels of the object the resulting image size will differ by one or two pixels. To solve the “dimension” problem, the simplest method is to use Image -> Canvas Size. Set the canvas to about 20 pixels larger in each direction. Select “center” (the dot in the middle next to anchor) and set the fill color to match the background.

Expand the canvas and center the image

Expand the canvas and center the trimmed image

After Trim and Canvas Size

After Trim and Canvas Size

The above procedure will work quite well for animating a sequence of sun or moon shots – except for eclipses.  Eclipses don’t work properly because an edge of the sun or moon disappears leaving no edge to properly orient with the others.

What can we do when we no longer have constant edges to align with?  Divide and conquer! Instead of trying to apply the same action to all of the images, we will can change edge we select when enlarging the canvas size. We can orient sets of images based on which part of the image remains constant.   Which edge or corner should you pick? Pick the edge that stays the same (if there is one!)  For an Annular solar eclipse, at least one of the directions will never be darkened – that’s the one to pick!  The annular eclipse sequence shows that the upper left limb and lower right limbs of the sun remain present in all of the shots.

Field Rotation

There may still be another problem: Field Rotation. If you’re thinking that perhaps this has something to do with improving crop yields on a farm, sorry to disappoint you. The Annular Solar Eclipse and the Transit of Venus were events that took place over a period of from 3 to 5 hours.  During that period the earths rotation causes the sun, moon and stars to move. It also causes them to “turn” as viewed from terra firma.  You can see this for yourself if you watch the full moon from moonrise to moonset. At moonrise make note of the orientation of the “man on the moon” and compare it with the orientation at moonset. Go ahead and watch. I’ll wait for you.

So what do you do if you have this field rotation?  Either live with it and accept that the animation won’t be entirely accurate, or you’ll have to do a much more complicated set of operations by progressively rotating the images.  That’s more than we want to tackle, so you’re on your own for that!

The Results

The Annular solar eclipse sequence. The Abstract Solar Art image at the top of this article was created from the un-centered and trimmed frames. Obviously this wasn’t perfect – in part due to clouds and shimmer in the atmosphere.

Not seeing the above video? It requires FLASH, so click here to watch.

Obviously this one had some trimming errors… and nasty dust on the sensor but this is the once in a lifetime Transit of Venus.
Not seeing the above video? It requires FLASH, so click here to watch.